Tag: democrats

If Dems Don’t Win the House in November, Can They Kiss 2020 Goodbye?

YM: Today I am allowed the mighty pleasure of featuring an analytical piece from Mark Sasse—a jack of many trades; master of all—but a man I recognize firstly as an early impetus for my interest in politics and related matters.

Mark W Sasse is a novelist and award-winning playwright who loves to dabble in the frivolity of political speculation when not knee-deep in the creative arts. His new novel The African Connection is book two in his low fantasy thriller series The Forgotten Child Trilogy. In his former life, he taught history and English in both Vietnam and Malaysia. He currently teaches theatre in Saudi Arabia. When he’s not writing or teaching, he’s cooking spicy Asian food or watching baseball. Check out his work on mwsasse.com

Mid-term elections are volatile. Almost always. They historically display the cantankerousness of the American electorate with pristine clarity. Mid-term elections are like the shiny new Christmas toy that finds itself dunked in an April mud puddle simply because you’ve become bored with it. That’s what happens. Two years after a presidential election is just enough time for the euphoria of “change” and “hope” and “greatness” and all other election slogans to wear thin to such a degree that the populace brutally penalizes the president’s party to let the other jokers have their turn messing things up. It’s a cynical cycle without question. The numbers back this up very clearly. Let’s take a look at the data before conjecturing their meaning for 2018.

Continue reading “If Dems Don’t Win the House in November, Can They Kiss 2020 Goodbye?”

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NPP #6: Old Men With Good Resumes

As a part of a daily series called Non-Political Politics (NPP), Yusoof Monawvil posts daily maps on the obscure, quirky, and unconventional aspects of the United States’ key political institutions—in an undoubtedly non-political manner


NPP #6_ Service in the House

Light green: none of delegation has experience in House | Green: One of delegation has experience in House | Dark green: both of delegation has experience in House


Today’s map takes a look at Senators with experience serving in the lower chamber of Congress—the House of Representatives.

With a total of fifty Senators, exactly half of the Senate has experience in the House. Of this fifty, twenty-six are Republicans, twenty-three are Democrats, and one—Vermont’s Bernie Sanders—is an independent.

NPP #5: Southern Party-Switchers

As a part of a daily series called Non-Political Politics (NPP), Yusoof Monawvil posts daily maps on the obscure, quirky, and unconventional aspects of the United States’ key political institutions—in an undoubtedly non-political manner


Today’s NPP map takes a look at party-switching among Senators. party-switching-npp5

Blue: consistent party affiliation  |  Mid-purple: one Senator has switched party affiliation  |  Purple: both Senators have switched party affiliation


Unlike most NPP maps I make, this one shows some geographic correlation. It seems that the Deep South has a higher proportion of party-switching Senators than other regions of the United States.

At first glance, one might assume that these Senators were part of the old Yellow Dog Democrat brand but in reality, this only accounts for Mississippi’s Thad Cochran—a Southern Democrat who turned Republican amidst the nomination of Richard Nixon in 1968.

The other three Southern Senators—all former Democrats—switched parties much later than Nixon’s nomination and presidency.

  • John Neely Kennedy (LA): 2007
  • Bill Cassidy (LA): 2001
  • Richard Shelby (AL): 1994

As years went on, Southern Democratic Senators found that the increasingly progressive platform of the party hurt them in the polls. Far from being the remnants of an old Southern Democratic political machine, these Senators’ party switches were the results of political polarization and the slow disintegration of the Democratic big tent.

 

Midterm Profile: Sherrod Brown

This week’s midterm profile takes a look at Ohio’s Senior Senator, Sherrod Brown, the populist Democrat from Mansfield.

Josh_Mandel
CC BY 2.0

With Josh Mandel essentially being a shoo-in inside the GOP primary, Democrats nationwide are skeptical of Brown’s ability to keep up with his young opponent, whom he beat in the last election by a margin of six points.

Even though Brown comes from a state that Trump won in by a sizeable margin, his consistent fiscal policy and bipartisan work sets him apart from many Senate Democrats. When it came to Ohio and the Democratic firewall states in last year’s election, it was Democrats of a more liberal and seemingly distanced brand that led dissatisfied independents to go the Trump route.

Sherrod Brown definitely is not the polar opposite of Trump-voting Republicans. He opposed NAFTA when he served in the House and voiced dissent regarding the Trans-Pacific Partnership during the Obama White House.

Unlike Trump, Brown has remained consistent in this shared regard—eager to point out the Trump White House’s dependence on corporate America, calling the White House “a retreat for Goldman Sachs executives.”

All in all, I’d say that Democrats ought to pay more attention to the races of Michigan’s Debbie Stabenow, Montana’s Jon Tester, and Missouri’s Claire McCaskill. I’d go as far as to say that taking up a more populist platform and attitude like Brown’s might help them secure their seats.