NPP #6: Old Men With Good Resumes

As a part of a daily series called Non-Political Politics (NPP), Yusoof Monawvil posts daily maps on the obscure, quirky, and unconventional aspects of the United States’ key political institutions—in an undoubtedly non-political manner


NPP #6_ Service in the House

Light green: none of delegation has experience in House | Green: One of delegation has experience in House | Dark green: both of delegation has experience in House


Today’s map takes a look at Senators with experience serving in the lower chamber of Congress—the House of Representatives.

With a total of fifty Senators, exactly half of the Senate has experience in the House. Of this fifty, twenty-six are Republicans, twenty-three are Democrats, and one—Vermont’s Bernie Sanders—is an independent.

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NPP #4: Children of the Senate

As a part of a daily series called Non-Political Politics (NPP), Yusoof Monawvil posts daily updates on the obscure, quirky, and unconventional aspects of the United States’ key political institutions—in an undoubtedly non-political manner


In light of recent events, today’s map addresses the matter of children in the Senate.

…I speak not of childish or immature acts on the floor of the Senate, but of the actual children of Senators.

Sum of Senators' Children


Some noteworthy points of interest:

  • Arizona’s Senators have a total of twelve children between them: Senator Flake with five children, and Senator McCain with seven children.
  • Utah’s delegation comes second with a total of nine children between Senator Lee and President Pro Tempore Hatch, with three and six children, respectively.
  • Out of South Carolina’s delegation, neither Tim Scott nor Lindsey Graham have any children.

NPP #3: Gender in the Senate

 

As a part of a daily series called Non-Political Politics (NPP), Yusoof Monawvil posts daily updates on the obscure, quirky, and unconventional aspects of the United States’ key political institutions—in an undoubtedly non-political manner


npp-three-genderinthesenateBlue: Delegation fully male | Purple: Delegation split| Red: Delegation fully female


Today’s NPP map features a look at the gender makeup of the Senate. Though women make up little over a fifth of the Senate with a total of twenty-one seats being filled by women, only three states have fully female delegations: New Hampshire, Washington, and California. Out of those twenty-one female Senators, sixteen are Democrats, and five are Republicans.

Quite curiously, both members of New Hampshire’s delegation were governor directly prior to being elected to the Senate, Freshman Senator Maggie Hassan’s tenure being from 2013 to 2017 and Senior Senator Jeanne Shaheen’s tenure lasting from 1997 to 2003.

 

 

NPP #1: Senility of the Senate

As a part of a daily series called Non-Political Politics (NPP), Yusoof Monawvil posts daily updates on the obscure, quirky, and unconventional aspects of the United States’ key political institutions—in an undoubtedly non-political manner


Ages of SenatorsNPP.png


Today’s map shows the mean age of each state’s Senate delegation in the 115th Congress. With Senator Bernie Sanders (76 years) and former President Pro Tempore Patrick Leahy (77 years), Vermont tops the chart with a mean age of 76.5 years. At the other end of the spectrum, Cory Gardner (43 years) and Michael Bennet (52 years) give Colorado the title of youngest Senate delegation with a mean age of 47.5 years.


All NPP maps are original content made by Yusoof Monawvil

A Word on Mapping Bias

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Level 1 (<525) | Level 2 (525-530) | Level 3 (530-535) | Level 4 (535-540) | Level 5 (<540)


So you come across this map on an article relating to an issue or policy you’re a bit skeptical of. You see the geographic correlation in the map—the number of units (in parentheses) is very low in the northern Mountain States and Dakotas. If you’re like most people, you gloss over the details of the map and cede over that the author might have some sort of a point. After all… you can see that the data sources the map was written by are credible—the author seems to have provided objective proof.

Continue reading “A Word on Mapping Bias”